Should I Apply to Become a Fool?

By | Posted at 0:07
You scored as Verbal/Linguistic. You have highly developed auditory skills, enjoy reading and writing and telling stories, and are good at getting your point across. You learn best by saying and hearing words. People like you include poets, authors, speakers, attorneys, politicians, lecturers and teachers.

Verbal/Linguistic

86%

Interpersonal

75%

Intrapersonal

71%

Visual/Spatial

54%

Musical/Rhythmic

46%

Logical/Mathematical

36%

Bodily/Kinesthetic

18%

The Rogers Indicator of Multiple Intelligences
created with QuizFarm.com

Found via Christopher.


Re: Should I Apply to Become a Fool?

This test was kind of funny, don't you think? :) Seems like your result is spot on!

Posted by Flip - Mar 29, 2005 | 12:10

Re: Should I Apply to Become a Fool?

hahahahahahahahahahha. Pretty good one. The only thing they messed up was by not seperating vocal from written. My weakness is the written word while speaking in public, in front of people, etc etc comes very naturally for me. And yes I can juggle. lol

——————-

You scored as Bodily/Kinesthetic.

You process knowledge through bodily sensations and use your body in skilled ways. You need opportunities to move and act things out. You learn best by touching, moving around, and processing knowledge through bodily sensations. People like you include carpenters, repairpersons, mechanics, dancers, gymnasts, swimmers and jugglers.

Musical/Rhythmic

89%

Bodily/Kinesthetic

89%

Intrapersonal

79%

Logical/Mathematical

79%

Visual/Spatial

75%

Interpersonal

54%

Verbal/Linguistic

36%

Posted by Mark - Mar 29, 2005 | 13:52

Re: Should I Apply to Become a Fool?

I know too much about testing to do well on these things. Still, I suppose it close enough:

Verbal/Linguistic 82%
Intrapersonal 82%
Interpersonal 75%
Musical/Rhythmic 71%
Visual/Spatial 71%
Bodily/Kinesthetic 61%
Logical/Mathematical 54%

The problem is that too many tests assume a preference is equivalent to ability. Also, there are few subtle nuances as when someone can do all things well, but circumstances require spending more time on one or another ability. I seldom need to do math, but always tested well in school for it, and do understand a great deal of number theory.

Posted by Ed Hurst - Mar 29, 2005 | 17:20

Re: Should I Apply to Become a Fool?

Flip: yes, I agree, it was kind of silly.

Mark: That distinction would have made sense.

Ed: I know what you mean. I'd score a lot higher on math if it was based on ability rather than preference. I too always tested well on it, although my verbal scores would always be higher on standardized tests. While I'm not one for the raw sciences, I can get through most of them well too, but again, preference wise they will score low.

Posted by Timothy R. Butler - Mar 30, 2005 | 5:33

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